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DIY Cold-Pressed Juice Two Ways

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DIY Cold-Pressed Juice Two Ways

Cold-pressed juice is a huge trend in downtown Toronto, and it’s a rare luxury that I usually don’t partake in because the juices tend to be so expensive. One day while I was craving cold-pressed beet juice, I was shocked to look at the $11 price tag on a bottle in a vegan health foods store in Toronto. I thought, what’s stopping me from making it at home?

Well, first of all, a juicer. I had never tried to make homemade fruit or vegetable juice because we don’t have a ton of fancy, cool kitchen gadgets, much less a juicer. So I took down the Magic Bullet blender from the cupboard, and tried blending the same ingredients as in those expensive bottles of juice. It worked!

DIY Cold-Pressed Juice Two Ways

Now straining the pulp is probably the most annoying part of the process, but it’s what makes the juice taste like the expensive bottled stuff.

DIY Cold-Pressed Juice Two Ways

You can decide how much pulp to leave or take out, which is another plus of doing it yourself. Fruit and vegetable pulp are actually really good for you, so I tend to leave a tiny bit in just for expediency’s sake and for the health benefits. That’s what you’re making the juice for in the first place right?!

DIY Cold-Pressed Juice Two Ways       DIY Cold-Pressed Juice Two Ways

These DIY Cold-Pressed Juice recipes are perfect because they are easily made in a Magic Bullet as a single serving for drinking on the go. It takes a bit of time to make them (15 minutes) but they are definitely refreshing and a great source of vitamins and nutrients. If you haven’t had your greens or enough vegetables in a day, juices and smoothies can be a great way to get a big dose of healthy all at once.

DIY Cold-Pressed Juice Two Ways       DIY Cold-Pressed Juice Two Ways

Lemons are great to ingest in the morning because of their detoxing properties–both the Beet Juice and the Green Juice have a whole lemon in each of them, so they are both a great digestive aid when you drink them in the morning.

DIY Cold-Pressed Juice Two Ways

On an empty stomach, you will reap the most of the juice’s benefits–though I also like to keep these kinds of juice on hand for after school or work. Sometimes you just need a little refresher after a long day.

DIY Cold-Pressed Juice Two Ways

Look at the colour in these juices! Will you be trying the Beet Juice or the Green Juice? Sometimes it’s hard for me to choose which one to make!

Print Recipe
DIY Cold-Pressed Juice Two Ways Yum
These DIY Cold-Pressed Juice recipes are a delicious and healthy way to start your morning! Try the Beet Juice, or Green Juice.
DIY Cold-Pressed Juice Two Ways
Votes: 2
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Course Breakfast
Prep Time 15 minutes
Servings
of each juice
Ingredients
Course Breakfast
Prep Time 15 minutes
Servings
of each juice
Ingredients
DIY Cold-Pressed Juice Two Ways
Votes: 2
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Instructions
  1. In a blender (you can use a Magic Bullet for a single serving but use half of the above), blend all of the above ingredients for each juice with about a half cup of water until smooth.
  2. There will be a lot of pulp, so using a fine mesh sieve or fine strainer and a bowl underneath to catch the juice, strain the pulp from each juice. You may have to get your hands dirty and squeeze the juice from the pulp itself--there will be a lot of it!
  3. My recommendation is to leave some of the pulp in, but to strain most of it. You will most likely have to double strain each juice. Tip: you can always add some more water to assist in straining.
  4. Juice will be concentrated, so add to a large glass of ice cubes. As the ice cubes melt in the juice, it will become less concentrated and more enjoyable to drink the cooler the juice gets.
  5. Keep in fridge up to 2 days.

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3 Comments

  • Reply
    Sabina
    September 17, 2015 at 10:38

    Great idea and recipes (also waaay easier to clean up after than if using a juicer)! I use a nut milk bag (food-grade cotton bag with a drawstring) to strain rhe liquid when I juice with my blender. The leftover pulp gets frozen for future use in smoothies, soups, baked goods, etc. 🙂

  • Reply
    Evan
    March 31, 2016 at 16:22

    Great recipe and I love your blog! Although I have to point out so that you are aware, this is not by any means a cold press method. Cold pressed juices are called such because they are made with a masticating juicer which works by slowly pressing without shredding the produce with blades. Using a blender or even a centrifugal juicer emits heat in the process destroying some of the nutrients, contradicting the term “Cold Press”. I don’t honestly understand why companies sell these juices on store shelves either because they are best when consumed immediately. The longer they are exposed to air the less nutrient value they retain. You are better off saving your money at the store and sticking to your blender method at home!
    Thanks!

    • Reply
      Taylor Stinson
      April 9, 2016 at 12:58

      Thanks for pointing that out, Evan! I should have perhaps written “Inspired by cold-pressed juices” instead – I agree with you on making juices at home though, so much cheaper and just as delicious 😉

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